Selected Ambient Shots 11-15

Chroma Night

Landscapes
Light Painting Set 3

Chroma Night 

Landscapes
Light Painting Set 2

Chroma Night 

Landscapes
Light Painting Set 1

amymctigue:

Ladies and Gentlemen, 
Please do come to our exhibition opening in The Atrium of Temple Bar Gallery on Friday June 14
Facebook page is here

amymctigue:

Ladies and Gentlemen, 

Please do come to our exhibition opening in The Atrium of Temple Bar Gallery on Friday June 14

Facebook page is here

(via how-fascinating)

THE NEIGHBORS BY ARNE SVENSON

With Arne Svenson’s new series, Neighbors, he has turned outward from his usual studio based practice to study the daily activities of his downtown Manhattan neighbors as seen through his windows into theirs. Svenson has always combined a highly developed aesthetic sense viewed from the perspective of social anthropology in his eclectic projects with subjects ranging from prisoners to sock monkeys. His projects are almost always instigated by an external or random experience which brings new objects or equipment into his life- in this case he inherited a bird watching telephoto lens from a friend.

The grid structure of the windows frame the quotidian activities of the neighbors, forming images which are puzzling, endearing, theatrical and often seem to mimic art history, from Delacroix to Vermeer. The Neighbors is social documentation in a very rarified environment. The large color prints have been cropped to various orientations and sizes to condense and focus the action.

Shortlisted for 2 categories in Smedias

I just got shortlisted for Photographer of the Year along with 2 of the girls in my college and News Photographer of the Year in the National Student Media Awards.

kaajoo:

Children around the world with their most prized possessions

Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti’s project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys. Galimberti explores the universality of being a kid amidst the diversity of the countless corners of the world; saying, “at their age, they are pretty all much the same; they just want to play.”

Names in the order of photos (left to right)

  1. Watcharapom – Bangkok, Thailand
  2. Alessia – Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy
  3. Shaira – Mumbai, India
  4. Botlhe – Maun, Botswana
  5. Chiwa – Mchinji, Malawi
  6. Cun Zi Yi – Chongqing, China
  7. Bethsaida – Port au Prince, Haiti
  8. Arafa & Aisha – Bububu, Zanzibar
  9. Stella – Montecchio, Italy
  10. Pavel – Kiev, Ukraine

Source: Feature Shoot

(via siobhan-dillon)

Becoming’ by Fiona Yaron Field

When I was told my new born daughter had Down’s syndrome, I looked at her sleeping in my arms and rather than see my baby girl I saw an image of a middle aged woman, white socks, pudding basin haircut, holding her ageing mother’s hand in some supermarket. This immediate mental image was hard to push away, then, it was my only reference.

Now 16 years later I watch my daughter and her friends forging their identities, aspiring to the same images of beauty, of love, of popularity as their typically developing peers. ‘Becoming’ celebrates their individuality as they struggle, like their peers, to become who they are.

My portraits are about the individuals and not the condition. They aim to challenge out-dated attitudes and prejudice by offering an alternative photographic representation of people with Down’s syndrome. Stereotypes, which can be either positive or negative, are one dimensional. They dismiss the complexity and depth that people experience both with themselves and in relationship to others. They deny the person any ‘real’ identity.

My position as a photographer and mother of a child with Down’s syndrome has been central to my work. Being a photographer/mother influences the quality of relationship I form with my subjects, a quality perhaps closer to kinship. I feel a resonance, as though when we look at each other, we not only see the other but we also see ourselves. The photograph is directly referring to my own experience too. For both photographer and subject there is a unified feeling of working together to actively create social change. I believe that this shifts ‘being photographed’ from a passive event into an act of empowerment.’

‘Becoming’ is one series of portraits within a larger body of work made over the last 8 years. These include: ‘Disclosure’, ‘Up Close’, ‘Portraits’, ‘Ordinary Love’ and ‘Safe Haven’. The work tours both in the UK and overseas as part of Shifting Perspectives.